02

Blog

Idaho Bike Laws

IDAHO BICYCLE LAWS

Right to the Road

  • Idaho bicyclists generally have the same rights, and same duties, as drivers of motor vehicles.

Prohibitions

  • Bicycles may only carry the number of persons for which it is designed, except an adult may carry a child in a backpack or sling.
  • Cyclists cannot hang onto or attach themselves to vehicles or ride so close as to present a danger

Helmets

  • There is no requirement for helmets for anyone on a bicycle

Alcohol

  • Idaho’s DUI statute does not apply to bicyclists.
  • Local ordinances may impact impaired cyclists

Where to Ride

  • Bicycles are to ride as close as practicable to the right side of the roadway except when overtaking another bicyclist, when preparing to make a left turn, when necessary to avoid a fixed or slow moving object or vehicle or when riding in a substandard width lane.
  • On one-way roads bicyclists may ride are near the left hand side of the roadway as is practicable.

Sidewalks

  • Sidewalk riding is generally permitted except where prohibited by local ordinance.
  • Cyclists  riding on a sidewalk must yield the right of way to pedestrians and must give an audible signal before passing.

Motor Vehicle Doors

  • No person may open the door of a motor vehicle unless it is safe to do so.

Bike Lanes, Bike Paths and Multi-Use Paths

  • Idaho bicyclists are generally allowed to use the roadway
  • In Boise City where a bike Lane is provided on or “immediately adjacent to” the roadway cyclists required to ride in or upon the bike lanes or paths roadway with exceptions for right and left turns and to avoid hazards.

Stop Signs and Traffic Control Devices

  • Bicyclists coming to a stop sign must slow, and if required for safety , stop.  If no car is approaching that causes an immediate hazard during the crossing of the intersection the cyclist may proceed through the stop-sign without stopping.  (Stop as yield)
  • Bicyclists coming to a red light must stop and yield to all other traffic. If safe the cyclist may proceed through the intersection  (Stop Light as Stop SIgn)

Signaling

  • Bicyclists must use hand/arm signals when turning and stopping unless the hand is needed to control the bicycle.

Drivers Overtaking Bicyclists

  • A vehicle passing a bicyclist must not do so in a way that interferes with the operation of the bicycle.
  • In Boise City, a driver must give a cyclist 3-Feet clearance to pass.  

 Bicycles Passing on the Right

  • A bicyclist may pass a car on the right if there is unobstructed pavement sufficient for 2 or more lines of vehicles and the pass may be done safely.
  • In Boise City it is legal to pass on the right.

Group Riding

  • Bicyclists may not ride more than 2 abreast, must not impede the “normal and reasonable movement” of traffic and must stay within a single lane..

Equipment

  • Every bicycle must be equipped with a white front facing headlight visible from at least 500 feet when used at nighttime..
  • Every bicycle must have a red reflector clearly visible from the rear of the bicycle
  • In Boise City, every bicycle shall be equipped with a brake which will stop it in twenty five feet (25′) at ten (10) miles per hour on dry, level, clean pavement;

Electric Assist Bikes

  • Idaho Law (Idaho Code 49-106) defines an electric assisted bicycle as an electric motor-driven vehicle equipped with operable pedals, a seat or saddle for the rider, no more than three wheels in contact during travel. In addition, the vehicle must be equipped with an electric motor that is capable of applying a power output of no greater than 750 watts, and that is incapable of propelling the vehicle at a speed greater than 28 miles per hour on level ground
  • Bicyclists may use a  e-bikes in the same matter as traditional bicycles but local ordinance may prohibit them from specific pathways.

Comments

Minnesota Cycling Advocate
Daniel Brazil Jul 01, 2020

I recently had the great opportunity to interview fellow cycling advocate, Dave Sanderson, the chair of Pedal Fergus Falls, a Minnesota bike advocacy group. What began as a simple conversation about advocacy turned into an inspiring deep dive into the work Pedal Fergus Falls has done and continues to do for our cycling community. Pedal […]

Read More
Bike Safety
Daniel Brazil Jun 05, 2020

As a cyclist (and bike crash attorney), I often worry that I’m placing my life in the hands of motorists each time I hop on my bike. And stories like this one about bike safety recently shared on Outside Online heighten my fears, as cyclist deaths continue to rise across the U.S. even in a […]

Read More
Biking After COVID 5
Ann Groninger May 28, 2020

What will biking after COVID be like? Before COVID, it seemed like there was a handful of people in my city who rode bikes to get places, and we all knew each other. We’ve always had a robust recreational road riding community of people who gather after work and on weekends to head out to […]

Read More
Bike Advocate
Bruce Hagen May 26, 2020

If you’ve ridden a bike anywhere in Atlanta, chances are you’ve met Atlanta bike advocate Angel Poventud.  If you’ve stopped for a post-ride beer, been to an important advocacy event, or to any major Atlanta gathering, chances are you have met Angel Poventud.   It may only seem that Angel is everywhere, but when you […]

Read More
Bicycle accident lawyer group riding in COVID
Kurt Holzer May 15, 2020

Idaho’s Governor Little has issued the State’s planned staged transition away from his Stay-at-Home health order.  Road cyclists continue to wonder how we should engage in group riding under COVID. As a bicycle accident lawyer who deals with the negative aspects of cycling, I have been thinking a lot about when and how to ride safely […]

Read More
Felix Mayer Cyclist killed by car. NO VRU law
Bruce Hagen Apr 30, 2020

On May 1, 2020, the City of Dunwoody’s new Vulnerable Road User (“VRU”) ordinance will take effect, the first such law to be enacted anywhere in the State of Georgia.  Hopefully neighboring municipalities like Sandy Springs, Roswell and Chamblee will follow suit, and more importantly, the State of Georgia.   VRU laws recognize and prioritize […]

Read More
Load More