Our Mission

Bicycle crashes are not bike accidents. Lawyers in the Bike Law Network have handled thousands of them and we know the difference.

Bike Law is not a law firm, but a network of independent lawyers and law firms who share a common approach to the law and to helping cyclists.

Our methods and processes have been honed over the last fifteen years: we have handled every type of bicycle crash, and have learned (and will continue to learn) how to do it better.  Lawyers in the Bike Law Network share insight and experience to serve cyclists.  Our Network is growing, and as it does, each of us learns more.

Why a Bicycle Lawyer is Different

As cyclists, we take a different approach because we understand how important cycling is, and how devastating it can be to be hit on a bike and lose the ability or desire to ride.  Our goal is to be social as well as legal advocates, and we strive to help clients get back up riding as soon as possible.

Once we get a case, we work with the police to get the facts and fault right, we guide you through medical treatment and billing, negotiate with insurance companies, and, when necessary, file suit and go to trial.

We also provide pro bono legal advice to cycling clubs and teams – about insurance, organizational structure, advocacy efforts, bicycle safety and more.  We regularly speak at bike club meetings and are happy to come to yours.

Bike Attorneys are Advocates for All Cyclists

Lawyers in the Bike Law network of bicycling attorneys are advocates for all cyclists. That means commuters, racers, beginners, and advanced riders. If you ride a bicycle for any reason, for pleasure, for transportation, for sport, we advocate for your bicycling rights and safety.

Bicycling lawyers are here to protect you on the road. By going after the texting teenagers or the speeding sports car driver who hits you, you are sending a message to other drivers and also insurance companies. You are saying we aren’t going to take it anymore! Drivers and cyclists need to be mindful, drive carefully, and share the road. We both pay for it with tax dollars and we both need to obey the rules established on the road.