02

Blog

Amy Easter: Winston Salem Bicycle Advocate

Rides, Community, Culture, Advocacy

I always say that my favorite thing about bicycling is getting to meet other people that are super passionate about bicycling. One of those people is Amy Easter. I’ve met Amy a number of times over the years at various advocacy events and was so excited to connect with her to talk about all the amazing things she and her husband, Jake Easter, are doing for bicycling in Winston Salem.

Amy and Jack Easter

First a little background: Like many people, Amy grew up in suburbia where she rode her bike to visit friends or get soda and candy from the convenience store. But when she grew up and started driving, she set her bicycle aside and became a motorist.

It turns out, though, that bicycles remained a part of Amy’s destiny. Amy met her future husband, Jake, an avid bicyclist. It took a few years, but Jake eventually got Amy a bike and she started riding again. Amy describes herself as “not competitive and not particularly athletic” but she enjoyed doing something she felt was unique and fun and being able to get some exercise doing it. Realizing she could ride her bike to school at GTCC and save money doing so was an added bonus.

Amy Easter: Winston Salem Bike Advocate

In 2009, Amy and Jake moved to Raleigh, which Amy describes as having “a great bike culture with a variety of social rides and other activities centered on bicycling.” For example, Oak City Bike Shop always had creative and interesting events planned and Oaks and Spokes put on an annual multi-day festival with many different activities. Through Crank Arm Brewery, Jake started Crank Arm rides, a no drop social ride that provides a great introduction to Raleigh and a welcoming environment for those who are new to bicycling. For Amy, their 5 years in Raleigh “really set the stage for the idea of bicycling as a social thing.”

Then in 2014, Amy and Jake moved to Winston-Salem. Amy looked around and asked herself, “where’s all the bike stuff?” Winston-Salem has thousands of people who ride bikes. Road cycling is strongly intertwined in the city’s history. But bicycling culture there seemed very disparate and disjointed. Amy wanted to bring the Raleigh bicycle culture to Winston-Salem.

Launching from a blog Jake had been writing for a few years, they started BeersNGears to bring the social aspect of bicycling to the city. In 2016, they put on the first annual HalloWheels Festival – a 4 day event including a scavenger hunt, group rides and a race.

BeersNGears

The first Thursday night of each month is Open Bike Night, where the Easters open up their “shop” (ie. their garage) and put out bike stands and tools. People come by and bring bikes to work on or just to hang out. It gives them the opportunity to have one on one conversations with other bicyclists. Amy describes the gathering as “very meaningful because it empowers people to do things on their bikes.”

Following the Crank Arm model, about a year ago, BeersNGears partnered with the Fiddlin’ Fish Brewery for a weekly ride. Every week is a 10-15 mile ride (shorter in winter). It can be faster or slower, depending on who shows up, but no one is ever dropped. Between Amy’s organizational enthusiasm and Jake’s “amazing route planning skills,” the ride draws more and more people every week.

And that’s not all. BeersNGears has the contract to maintain Winston-Salem’s bike share fleet. They also own a rickshaw that they pull out for big events in town to give people rides and, a recent addition, a 15 passenger van with a trailer to haul 12 bikes, “to give people the opportunity to see other parts of the state by bicycle.”

But even all of that is not enough for Amy. A self-described “geeky advocate,” Amy wanted to advocate even more for bicycling with city government and found that BeersNGears maybe wasn’t the best name for an organization to partner with politicians. So BeersNGears then launched the Winston-Salem Cycling Advocacy Network (WSCAN).

Winston Salem Bike Advocate

WSCAN is designed to be a very open, welcoming and flexible network. Amy says: “whatever riding you’re interested in and support, you have a place in the network.” Amy wants WSCAN both “to be a collective voice” and “to provide value to people individually.” The idea of the network is to bring together like-minded people to help them complete their goals: “we know there are all these people out there who are doing great things or want to do great things, but don’t have the resources to get the word out or execute on events.”

The network, so far, is small, but growing and starting to become a force in the community. WSCAN holds a quarterly event called “Cycle Net” to provide a networking opportunity for people, all people, who ride bikes. The event is held at Footnotes and presents two short (10 minutes, tops) guest speakers to talk about anything bicycle related and provide a forum for “all bike people: road, mountain and geeky advocates like me.” The hope is “to address longstanding issues of the segregation within the bicycling community.”

Amy Easter Bike Advocate

As part of her mission to help grow Winston-Salem bicycling culture, Amy interacts as much as possible with local government officials. She is a big believer in individuals having facetime and relationships with representatives. “You can send a letter and nothing happens. But tell them in person – there’s a pothole that’s going to hurt someone – and it actually can get done. Sometimes it changes an internal process that helps prevent problems in the first place.”

Amy feels strongly that “other people should be empowered to do that and effect change. You have to make it easy for them to interact.” One goal with Cycle Net is to get that exposure by bringing local government officials to the meetings. She and Jake also blog about things that are happening locally, in order to make the information as accessible as possible. Work is underway to overhaul the WSCAN website for improved accessibility. They would like the new website to serve as a hub for information.

With all of the things they are doing for bicycling, you’ll probably be amazed to hear that Amy and Jake both have day jobs. Amy loves her job at Wells Fargo, in part because it gives her the flexibility to pursue the outside activities that she loves. Jake has his own mobile detailing business that he started back in Raleigh.

To make Winston-Salem a truly great bicycling city, it needs more people to become involved and contribute. So if you live in Winston-Salem, consider this your call to action. If you have two hours a week or a year, Amy has a role for you, in whatever area of bicycling you are passionate about.  

You can contact Amy directly at [email protected] 

Learn more about the Winston-Salem Cycling Advocacy Network and how to become a member: https://wscyclingadvocacynetwork.wordpress.com/join-the-network/

Visit http://www.beersngears.com for more information and updates on their events

Comments

Fairhope Bike Shop
Peter Wilborn Sep 16, 2019

Katie Bolton and her husband Joseph are the proud owners of Fairhope Cycle and Tri in Fairhope, Alabama – the eastern shore.  Their shop has been open for 8 years now and in addition to selling and servicing bicycles, the shop often is a “hub” for cycling events in the Fairhope area.   Katie grew up in […]

Read More
Rick Bernardi Sep 13, 2019

Stop as Yield. It was the legislative Holy Grail for Oregon cyclists. Idaho had pioneered the Stop As Yield concept—allowing cyclists to treat a stop sign as if it’s a yield sign—in 1982, and for decades, Idaho remained the only state where Stop as Yield was legal for cyclists, despite the actual practice being widespread, […]

Read More
Peter Wilborn Aug 20, 2019

A camera is necessary kit for every ride. But finding the right camera has been a challenge, until now. My rebuttable presumption: the Ricoh GR III is the best cycling camera of all time. Read on, and if you can prove there’s a better one, let me know. The Ideal Cycling Camera To find the […]

Read More
Human Shield Bike Lane
Bruce Hagen Jul 29, 2019

If you ride bikes around Atlanta, chances are that you know Niklas Vollmer and Andreas Wolfe.  They’re some of the many people in town who seem to live on their bikes and can be seen riding everywhere.  While they both have their “day jobs,” folks in the cycling world know them for their place in […]

Read More
Bruce Hagen Jul 19, 2019

This is a time when advocacy efforts are crucial to making our streets safer for everyone. Within 24 hours from the Two Wheel Tuesday gathering we suffered two more casualties.  On Wednesday morning, Marten Bijvank was on his way to work on his bicycle when he was struck and killed by an unlicensed DUI driver […]

Read More
AJ's Bicycle Shop in Iowa
Jim Freeman Jul 15, 2019

Bicycling Magazine recently published an article titled, “Hey, Bike Shops; Stop Treating Customers Like Garbage.”  The story follows a heavy-set 59 year old’s sad tale of how he was treated poorly from a number of local bike shops.   First and foremost, I would be clear that bikes are for almost everyone.  If you are big, […]

Read More
Bike accident scene
Rick Bernardi Jul 12, 2019

The big bike news out of the Oregon legislature this year was the passage of a Stop as Yield law. This was an enormous legislative victory for Oregon cyclists, the culmination of over a decade of advocacy. But it wasn’t the only legislative victory for Oregon cyclists this legislative session. A less glamorous but equally […]

Read More
Uber Biking Escort
Charlie Thomas Jul 11, 2019

I often find myself wanting to ride on a roadway corridor that doesn’t want me there. At best, I could make it across alive with some close calls and a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach. At worst, I wouldn’t be around to write this blog post.  Of course, a safer, alternate route […]

Read More
Cycling Without Age Bike Law
Brian Weiss Jul 11, 2019

The founder of the Lakewood Bicycle Advisory Team loves his life on two wheels. Gary Harty was born in Bellows Falls, Vermont, and raised in Colorado – Denver Metro area, and now makes bicycling in Lakewood, Colorado safe and fun.  Gary is part of the baby boomer generation. He attended Colorado State University (CSU) and […]

Read More
Rachael Maney Bike Law
Rachael Maney Jul 10, 2019

Outrage.  It is what drives action and engagement on the interwebs these days. If it’s not outrageous, it’s boring. The Election of 2018 proved that outrage increases TOS (“time on site”) more than friendship, sympathy, desire, or anything else.  Judgment. By definition it is necessary to reach any conclusion about anything. But passing it on […]

Read More
Stop as Yield for Cyclists
Rick Bernardi Jul 09, 2019

The Oregon Legislature made national news this past week, for all the wrong reasons. The State Senate, with a super-majority of Democrats in control, had been working on climate legislation which would have Oregon join a cap-and-trade market with California and Quebec. Unable to stop the legislation, Republican Senators fled the state en masse, preventing […]

Read More
Bike Law Alps
Charlie Thomas Jul 07, 2019

It’s Tour de France time. I follow the racing daily through the footage on TV feed and still photos. But I hadn’t ever considered what’s happening on the other side of the camera lens. Like, what actually goes into snapping these pictures that we see documenting the Tour’s happenings? I started to care more about […]

Read More
Load More