02

Blog

Charleston Bicycle Accident Lawyer: Charleston wasn’t designed for bike-loving college kids

Recently BikePortland.org wrote a blog posted called 4 things U.S. college towns could teach planners about biking.

The post explains how biking is more popular in college towns like Davis, CA, Eugene, OR, and Boulder, CO  because they are designed for it.  And when you have a well designed city that encourages biking and walking, you have a safer and more popular place to live.

But Charleston was definitely not one of those college towns designed for biking.  While the city has added some bike lanes to accommodate cycling, the roads are still not safe and the design does not make sense at all.  Spend five minutes at the corner of St. Phillip Street and Calhoun Street and you’ll witness one of the most dangerous areas where there is no infrastructure yet tons of people (mostly college students) are walking, biking and skateboarding in every direction.

The College of Charleston is the biggest, most buzzing area downtown.  So why not make that area the epicenter and expand everything outward from there?  The intersection at Calhoun King Streets could be re-designed into a barnyard intersection where everyone can cross safely.  Just make it easier for people to get around the city in general!

cofc

If the city focused on fixing the design to make it more bike-friendly, it would become more popular.  But the population on the peninsula has declined by almost 30% in the last 30 years and most people have moved out to West Ashley and James Island.  That could be because the city was focused on moving traffic in and out of the city faster by car, and created a maze of one way streets to do so.

But there is hope! The Post and Courier wrote early in November that in early 2014 the city will finally start working on turning Spring and Cannon back into two way streets!  By slowing cars down on two way streets, the quality of life will improve for downtown residents – pedestrians and bikers alike!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Biking After COVID 5
Ann Groninger May 28, 2020

What will biking after COVID be like? Before COVID, it seemed like there was a handful of people in my city who rode bikes to get places, and we all knew each other. We’ve always had a robust recreational road riding community of people who gather after work and on weekends to head out to […]

Read More
Bike Advocate
Bruce Hagen May 26, 2020

If you’ve ridden a bike anywhere in Atlanta, chances are you’ve met Atlanta bike advocate Angel Poventud.  If you’ve stopped for a post-ride beer, been to an important advocacy event, or to any major Atlanta gathering, chances are you have met Angel Poventud.   It may only seem that Angel is everywhere, but when you […]

Read More
Bicycle accident lawyer group riding in COVID
Kurt Holzer May 15, 2020

Idaho’s Governor Little has issued the State’s planned staged transition away from his Stay-at-Home health order.  Road cyclists continue to wonder how we should engage in group riding under COVID. As a bicycle accident lawyer who deals with the negative aspects of cycling, I have been thinking a lot about when and how to ride safely […]

Read More
Felix Mayer Cyclist killed by car. NO VRU law
Bruce Hagen Apr 30, 2020

On May 1, 2020, the City of Dunwoody’s new Vulnerable Road User (“VRU”) ordinance will take effect, the first such law to be enacted anywhere in the State of Georgia.  Hopefully neighboring municipalities like Sandy Springs, Roswell and Chamblee will follow suit, and more importantly, the State of Georgia.   VRU laws recognize and prioritize […]

Read More
Minnesota Cycling
Daniel Brazil Apr 23, 2020

On March 6, Minneapolis released a 252-page Transportation Action Plan. The plan’s ultimate goal is to expand transportation options for those walking, biking and taking public transit to get where they need to go.  Through this expansion, Minneapolis hopes to reduce the number of vehicles on the road, lowering greenhouse gas emissions. One of the […]

Read More
Bike to Work Corona
Daniel Brazil Apr 14, 2020

Not long ago, I published a post highlighting the great efforts being made by the co-chairs of the Saint Paul Bicycle Coalition. One of the co-chairs, Andy Singer, has garnered attention not just for his work for the Coalition but for his policy-based cartoons.  I asked Andy if he’d oblige to another interview to highlight […]

Read More
Load More